Vintage photo postcard dating

30-Oct-2016 03:05

No writing, other than the address, was allowed on the stamp side.

Now, by viewing the History of Bridges and Tunnels of Allegheny County, we can see that this picture shows the 1877 Point Bridge across The Monongahela River to the right of The Point (where the Ohio, Allegheny, and Monongahela Rivers meet) and the Union Bridge across the Allegheny River to the left of it. Notice the boats on the river and the train on the bridge.For instance, the postcard shown here of Pittsburgh, PA is determined to be circa 1902 – 1907, while the actual picture must be from the 1800s. During this time, postcards had an undivided address side, with horizontal lines running across.This was determined by fact that the use of the word “POST CARD” or “POSTCARD” (as one or two words) was granted by the government to private printers on Dec. This example card from Pittsburgh had a back as shown below: The “divided back” card, with space for a message on the address side, came into use in the United States in 1907. The “divided back” era is considered by many to be the “Golden Age” of postcard history because senders were now able write on the back of postcards leaving the front images intact.1898-1901 The Private Mailing Card These were the first cards authorized by Congress to be privately printed, yet mailed at the same one-cent rate as the government post-office postal cards.The law (passed May 19, 1898) authorizing these cards went into effect July 1st, 1898, and required the cards to be marked Private Mailing Card on the stamp side.

Now, by viewing the History of Bridges and Tunnels of Allegheny County, we can see that this picture shows the 1877 Point Bridge across The Monongahela River to the right of The Point (where the Ohio, Allegheny, and Monongahela Rivers meet) and the Union Bridge across the Allegheny River to the left of it. Notice the boats on the river and the train on the bridge.

For instance, the postcard shown here of Pittsburgh, PA is determined to be circa 1902 – 1907, while the actual picture must be from the 1800s. During this time, postcards had an undivided address side, with horizontal lines running across.

This was determined by fact that the use of the word “POST CARD” or “POSTCARD” (as one or two words) was granted by the government to private printers on Dec. This example card from Pittsburgh had a back as shown below: The “divided back” card, with space for a message on the address side, came into use in the United States in 1907. The “divided back” era is considered by many to be the “Golden Age” of postcard history because senders were now able write on the back of postcards leaving the front images intact.

1898-1901 The Private Mailing Card These were the first cards authorized by Congress to be privately printed, yet mailed at the same one-cent rate as the government post-office postal cards.

The law (passed May 19, 1898) authorizing these cards went into effect July 1st, 1898, and required the cards to be marked Private Mailing Card on the stamp side.

1867-1898 The Pioneer period predates the officially sanctioned private postcards.