Validating quantitative data triangulation model

13-Jun-2016 18:58

I’ve just recently had a discussion with a Ph D student about the difference between a method and a methodology, and about how these two things relate to questions of theory.

These are not problems that cause frustration only at the undergraduate level, but that accompany many scholars their entire careers.

Triangulation is not just about validation but about deepening and widening one’s understanding.

It can be used to produce innovation in conceptual framing.

ALISCH) to find quantitative researchers willing to consider that there might be a point to doing things the qualitative way at least some of the time.

This situation quite accurately reflects the methodological situation in the social sciences.

[] As it has turned out, this was obviously an overly optimistic idea, presupposing the existence of researchers on both sides of the methodological divide willing to take an unbiased look both at what they themselves do and what the "others" do in their research practice.

"Qualtative research in health care: Assessing quality in qualitative research." BMJ.

Triangulation facilitates validation of data through cross verification from more than two sources.

It tests the consistency of findings obtained through different instruments and increases the chance to control, or at least assess, some of the threats or multiple causes influencing our results.

All research methods have their pros and cons, the problem comes when you rely on just one method.

I’m often disappointed when UX and Ix D practitioners describe the research they do, and it’s obviously very one dimensional. Or they only do usability testing at the end of the project (it’s quite alarming but this practice does continue).

"Qualtative research in health care: Assessing quality in qualitative research." BMJ.

Triangulation facilitates validation of data through cross verification from more than two sources.

It tests the consistency of findings obtained through different instruments and increases the chance to control, or at least assess, some of the threats or multiple causes influencing our results.

All research methods have their pros and cons, the problem comes when you rely on just one method.

I’m often disappointed when UX and Ix D practitioners describe the research they do, and it’s obviously very one dimensional. Or they only do usability testing at the end of the project (it’s quite alarming but this practice does continue).

This problem isn’t restricted to UX and Ix D of course, our marketing brethren might do likewise, referring only to Roy Morgan for insight, for example.